Tuesday, January 20, 2009

That's My World Tuesday #14: Lassiter Falls


"Millrace at Lassiter Falls"
Raleigh, NC - November 2008 (Click to embiggen)

Be a virtual tour guide on That's My World Tuesday

At one time as many as 70 different water-powered mills were scattered across Wake County providing grain, lumber and in many cases a social center for residents of the communities they served. Mill ponds were common gathering places for fishing, swimming, and other social events. The lives of the community were inextricably tied to these facilities. What you see here is all that remains of Lassiter Mill, which was destroyed by fire in 1959. The site was originally called the "Great Falls of Crabtree" and was home to a number of mills beginning around 1780 -- a full 10 years before the City of Raleigh was founded. Though not the oldest mill in the area, it -- along with Yates Mill further to the south -- would continue to operate until the mid 20th Century. (Yates Mill closed under less dramatic circumstances in the same year that Lassiter Mill burned.) After passing through a succession of owners and operators, Cornelius Lassiter purchased the property in 1908 and built 2 40-horsepower turbines to harness the power of Crabtree Creek in the pursuit of milling both grain and lumber (this seemingly odd combination of businesses was common at the time). The Lassiter family kept the property until recent years when a small collection of upscale homes grew up around the old mill pond. The pond, dam and millrace were turned into a city park and renamed Lassiter Falls. Those of us who could be called "Old Raleigh", though, remember when this tract of land was pretty well untamed and perhaps a little spooky on a dark night.
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17 comments:

Carver said...

Great shot. I think I mentioned I did a post a while ago about Lassiter Mill but it's interesting seeing someone else's take on it. This was fun for me.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

Interesting post, Mojo. So, you've lived in Raleigh for a long time, have you? You must know tons about the area.

ms426d said...

Thnaks for sharing your history & pix. I am glad to hear new homes did not take over the entire area.

The Good Life in Virginia said...

what a wonderful tidbit of history from your part of the world...i have researched a lot of the textile mill(s) history in parts of north carolina when working on my books. enjoyed all of that so much.
thanks for sharing and have a wonderful week.

Guy D said...

Great shot Mojo, thanks for sharing.

Go Habs and Go Hurricanes!

Cheers!
Regina In Pictures

ewok1993 said...

It's always fascinating to learn some historical info from other people's world. Thanks.

Indrani said...

I have not seen mills so close. Lots of history here and you seem to have lived here long to have witnessed all!

Rural Writer said...

Interesting info and great story.

SandyCarlson said...

What a lovely place. We have a paper mill and the water that once powered the mill is about all that's left. A beautiful park.

Wren said...

Great text and pictures. I'm amazed at how ingenious people have been over the ages at building machines and harnessing nature.

Swarna said...

Nice bit of history. Hope the place remains pristine despite increased tourism

magiceye said...

that was such an interesting post

Shadow said...

and so little piece of history slowly disappear...

Reader Wil said...

A pity the mill was not restored later. History is important for everything.

Arija said...

A perfect My World post, depicting an historical site through the eyes of someone personnally connected with it. It always makes things more interesting with the personal toutch.

The Quintessential Magpie said...

Mojo, you always come up with the best shots! Kudos!

XO,

Sheila

Pernill@ said...

That is so beautifull !!
Really nice picture !
/ Pernilla